Eugene C. Pulliam Fellowship for Editorial Writing

The Pulliam Fellowship awards $75,000 to an outstanding editorial writer or columnist to help broaden his or her journalistic horizons and knowledge of the world. The annual award can be used to cover the cost of study, research and/or travel in any field. The fellowship results in editorials and other writings, including books.

Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for a Pulliam fellowship, a candidate must:

— Hold a position as a part-time or full-time editorial writer or columnist at a news publication located in the United States. Applications also are welcome from freelance opinion writers who devote a majority of their time, or derive a majority of their income, from that pursuit.
— Have at least three years experience as an editorial writer or columnist.
— Demonstrate outstanding writing and analytical abilities.
— Secure assurances by the editor or publisher that the applicant will be allowed sufficient time to pursue the fellowship without jeopardizing employment. (Fellows do not have to leave their jobs.)
— Demonstrate ability and intent to publish work within 18 months of selection. (If selected, work must be published within 18 months of receiving the fellowship).
— All entries must be in English.

The selected applicant must provide a post-fellowship written report on how funds were used. Each Fellowship recipient will become a mentor to the following year’s recipient.

https://www.spj.org/a-pulliamfellow.asp

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Spotlight Investigative Journalism Fellowship

The fellowship awards up to $100,000 for one or more individuals or teams of journalists to work on in-depth research and reporting projects. The chosen journalist(s) will collaborate with established investigative reporters and editors from The Boston Globe’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Spotlight Team.

It’s up to you whether to apply as an individual or as part of a team. You also have the choice of pursuing your own investigation or following leads developed by Globe journalists.You don’t have to live in Boston to be a Spotlight Fellow, but you’ll need to visit regularly for meetings.

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Coronavirus Rolling Grant for U.S. Freelancers

FIJ’s board of directors is looking for stories on the coronavirus that break new ground and expose wrongdoing—such as corruption, malfeasance, or abuse of power—in the public and private sectors.

FIJ encourages proposals written for ethnic media as well as those submitted by journalists of color and involving the impact of the coronavirus in U.S. ethnic communities.

Grants average $5,000 but can be as high as $10,000.  They cover out-of-pocket expenses such as travel, document collection, and equipment rental. FIJ also considers requests for small stipends.

FIJ will review proposals as they are submitted. Grant decisions can be expected within two weeks of submission of application

It is FIJ policy to pay the first half of approved grants to successful applicants upon approval, with the second half paid on publication of a finished project in accordance with the original proposal.

All application documents must be written in English and budgets expressed in U.S. Dollars.

Budget guidelines: Your estimated budget must itemize expenses such as travel, document fees, equipment rentals, and stipends. Be specific. Vague line items may be denied. Identify other sources of funding.

Guidelines for international reporting grants: To be considered, foreign-based story proposals must come from US-based reporters, have a strong US angle involving American citizens, government, or business, and must be published in English, in a media outlet in the United States.

https://investigate.submittable.com/submit/163797/coronavirus-rolling-grant-for-u-s-freelancers

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PEN Emergency Grant for Writers

PEN America will distribute grants of $500 to $1,000 based on applications that demonstrate an inability to meet an acute financial need, especially one resulting from the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak. We have developed a new streamlined process for the duration of this crisis, and expect to be able to review and respond to applications within 14 days.

To be eligible, applicants must be based in the United States, be a professional writer, and be able to demonstrate that this one-time grant will be meaningful in helping them to address an emergency situation. The fund is limited, and not every application can be supported.

The Writers’ Emergency Fund is intended to assist fiction and non-fiction authors, poets, playwrights, screenwriters, translators, and journalists. The following guidelines are used in evaluating professional credentials:

  • Publication of one or more books.
  • Multiple essays, short stories, or poems in literary anthologies or literary journals (either online or in print) in the last two years.
  • A full-length play, performed in a theater of more than 250 seats by a professional theater company. Productions in academic settings qualify if not a student at the time of the production.
  • Production of a motion picture project or a segment of television.
  • Employment as a full-time professional journalist, columnist, or critic or a record of consistent publication on a freelance basis in a range of outlets during the last two years.
  • Contracted forthcoming books, essays, short stories, poems, or articles for which the name of the publisher can be provided.
  • Other qualifications that support the applicant’s professional identity as a writer.

Writers do not have to be Members of PEN America to receive a grant, but all recipients of emergency funding will be given a complimentary one-year membership to PEN America.

https://pen.org/writers-emergency-fund/

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Facebook Journalism Project launches COVID-19 fund

ocal news organizations can apply for this new fund.

The Facebook Journalism Project (FJP) has created the FJP COVID-19 Local News Relief Fund Grant Program.

The program will offer grants of US$25,000 to US$100,000 to help local newsrooms serve their communities during the coronavirus outbreak. 

Preference will be given to organizations that serve immigrant, rural, underserved and economically disadvantaged communities; represent areas where COVID-19 impact is particularly acute; and are family- or community-owned or independent.

The deadline is April 24.

https://ijnet.org/en/opportunity/facebook-journalism-project-launches-covid-19-fund-us

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Staying safe while covering violent protests

https://ijnet.org/en/story/tips-staying-safe-while-covering-violent-protests

Safety basics for covering protests

  • Develop security protocols for every circumstance. Reporters need to go out into the field with protocols established and agreed upon with their editor and team. If an independent reporter lacks support from a newsroom, she should work with other freelance and/or staff colleagues to create a common protocol.
  • When possible, plan coverage with as much detail as possible. This should ideally include pre-scouting the area they’ll be covering. When journalists are in an area for the first time, they should do a quick inspection and identify escape routes and places where they can protect themselves in case violence erupts. This inspection could also include identifying elevated areas where they can take photos or record video.
  • Be aware of who the violent actors are and their political, religious, economic or cultural motivations. Journalists need to know — with as much detail as possible — which actors will respond most aggressively to journalists and what that aggression will look like.
  • Decide for yourself what kinds of circumstances require wearing distinctive IDs or jackets to identify yourself as a journalist. As a general rule, it’s usually better to be plainly identified as a member of the media, but in some cases this could attract more violence. In any case, IDs should always be on hand and available so they can be used when necessary.
  • Two-way communication with the newsroom needs to be constant. Journalists in the field should carry fully-powered, external batteries for their mobile phones. If possible, journalists can carry an additional small phone with them to use exclusively for making calls — it doesn’t have to be a smartphone.
  • Avoid contact with groups promoting violence or security forces who are about to deploy crowd control measures. When circumstances permit, it’s recommended to maintain a distance of at least 10 to 15 meters from those threatening to use violence. If you’re able to approach these actors in a controlled way, make sure these encounters are brief and organized. At all costs, it’s indispensable to avoid getting stuck in a confrontation between rival protesters or between protesters and security forces. 
  • Do Facebook Live broadcasts in teams of two or more people, so that way at least one person can pay attention to what’s happening in the area while also protecting the other person’s back. If there is violence, the reporter needs to be able to interrupt the transmission if his security is at risk.
  • Interviews with protestors or other actors should take place on street corners, with the interviewee up against a wall. The reporter should be able to have a complete view of what’s happening around them.
  • In cross-fire situations or if protesters are being fired upon, journalists should be trained in ducking down, seeking cover, identifying whether they are really hearing gunfire, and then identifying the source and the shooter(s). Journalists should also follow these steps when encountering rubber bullet fire. These can be lethal or cause severe damage if they hit the eyes.
  • Don’t use wet cloth in the event of a tear gas attack, as some tear gas substances can react negatively with water. Journalists in South Africa, for example, use condom lubricant to wipe their faces if they are tear gassed.
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Journalist Fellowship Programme at the Reuters Institute

We accept around 30 Journalist Fellows from around the world each year, each of whom bring fascinating insights and a wealth of experience to the institute. Here’s what is unique about our programme:

  • You will be embedded in a cutting-edge institution that is shaping key media debates. The Reuters Institute produces factsheets and reports on the main challenges of the industry.
  • You will be part of an institution with a global outlook. Our Journalist Fellows come from all over the world. They share ideas and experiences of working in different countries and different mediums.
  • You will be part of one of the world’s greatest universities. Oxford offers unrivalled study facilities, leading research centres, extensive learning support and a global reputation.
  • You will be just one hour from London by train, providing convenient access to some of the world’s leading news publishers like The Guardian, the Financial Times and the BBC.

To be considered for one of our journalist fellowships, you must have a minimum of five years’ journalistic experience, or in rare cases demonstrate the equivalent level of expertise.

You will be able to understand and join in discussions in English. If English is not your first language, please present suitable evidence —an original certificate no more than two years old and issued by the relevant body that you are at a suitable standard. You can find more information on the university’s English language requirements here

http://forms.reutersinstitute.co.uk/s3/Journalism-Fellowship-Programme-Application-Form

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The Joan Shorenstein Fellowship

The Joan Shorenstein Fellowship Program is designed to provide journalists, scholars, politicians and policymakers with an opportunity for reflection. A Fellowship offers busy professionals the time and resources needed to think, research, and write on issues central to our media and politics.

The primary focus of a fellow is to research and write a paper on a media/politics topic.  The Shorenstein Center strives to create an environment for fellows to do their best work, with faculty support, weekly discussion meetings with peers, and all the resources that Harvard has to offer, including world-class libraries and leading experts on a vast array of subjects.

During the semester fellows will attend regular events hosted by the Center, including thought-provoking speakers from the media and social gatherings. Fellows leave the Center having made lasting friendships and important professional connections.

It is our hope that fellows come away from their time at the Shorenstein Center having contributed to the field in a substantive way, and having embraced all the opportunities and activities that present themselves on a daily basis as a part of Harvard University. In an era when the noise of the constant news cycle leaves little time for reflection, the Shorenstein Center’s Fellowship Program aims to provide the space to think critically about our media and its role in our society; to shape the debate and understand which questions deserve the most attention; and to create a vibrant and long-lasting community of scholars and practitioners dedicated to meeting the challenges faced by our institutions.

Who should apply?

Since 1986, the Fellowship Program has brought hundreds of journalists, scholars and politicians from around the world to the Center. Past fellows include journalists from local, national and international TV, radio, print, and digital media; media and civic technology innovators; nonfiction authors; political advisors and policymakers; leading academic scholars in fields such as media research and political science; and policy analysts.

Successful former fellows have come from a variety of backgrounds and career stages. The Shorenstein Center is committed to diversity, and actively encourages applications from all demographic backgrounds, and across the political spectrum.

Am I eligible?

Applicants for Shorenstein Fellowships must be a working journalist, politician, scholar or policymaker currently or recently active in the field. The guidelines below offer further detail; however, if you unsure if you are eligible we encourage you to contact our staff to discuss further.

  • Journalist: Reporters, editors, columnists, producers, media business executives and related, with a minimum of five years of full-time experience either at professional news organizations or as a full-time freelancer (not including work completed as a university student).
  • Politician: Someone who has campaigned and been elected to a national or high-level state office, or communications professionals within politics and policy, e.g. speechwriters, press secretaries.
  • Scholar: Tenured or tenure-track professor employed by a college, university or research institution in political science, political communication, journalism, international political communication, or a field relevant to the Shorenstein Center’s areas of inquiry.
  • Policymaker: High-level official in a cabinet office or adviser to a candidate for national office.

Applicants should not have participated in another fellowship within the two years prior to their preferred semester.

Applicants must be fluent in English – listening, reading, writing and speaking. Non-native English speakers must provide TOEFL or IELTS score.

What is expected of a fellow?

Applicants must be available to be in residence, full-time, for one semester (September through December or February through May) in Cambridge, MA. Unfortunately we cannot consider requests for remote or nonresidential fellowships.

The Fellowship is a full-time appointment, and applicants are expected to commit to the work of completing their primary research project and engaging in the life of the Center, its activities and events. It is understood that busy modern professionals will have occasional essential obligations, and the Center aims to be considerate and flexible in such circumstances. However, any applicant with professional, personal or travel commitments that would require significant time away should consider applying when their schedule allows for the full commitment of a fellowship.

What will I be working on?

The primary deliverable for a fellow is a research paper in a style similar to a magazine essay, journal article or book chapter examining the influence of the media on politics or public policy in the domestic or international arena. Fellows’ papers are published on the Shorenstein Center website, and many have been cross published or excerpted in a variety of high-profile media outlets and academic journals, or have become the basis for a longer book. The quality and originality of an applicant’s research proposal is a key deciding factor in their potential selection.

Fellows who are journalists, policymakers or other practitioners will often seek to write papers that represent provocative or speculative arguments designed to stimulate debate among the wider community. Fellows who are university scholars usually write a paper based on original research with a well-supported and fully-documented conclusion.

Financial assistance and other resources

Fellows receive a stipend of $30,000, paid in monthly installments at the end of each month over the 4-month semester. Travel and living expenses are not covered by the Shorenstein Center.

Fellows are provided with a workstation in the Shorenstein Center fellows’ suite, a computer, phone, Harvard email address, and a Harvard ID allowing access to libraries and other resources.

Fellows are also able to select a paid Harvard Kennedy School student research assistant (eligible to work up to 10 hours per week) to work on their projects.

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O’BRIEN FELLOWSHIP IN PUBLIC SERVICE JOURNALISM

This is a reporting fellowship. If you are looking for a sabbatical, this is not the program for you.

O’Brien fellows will leave after an academic year with a world-class project on a topic of state, regional, national or international interest. See the Our Work section of our website for examples of the journalism produced by past fellows.

Fellows are expected to:

  • Work and travel from a home base in the O’Brien suite in the Diederich College of Communication at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Fellows live in Milwaukee.
  • Mentor and team with top Marquette journalism students in the pursuit of an investigative or explanatory journalism project.

Eligibility

Applicants should have at least five years of professional experience and produce journalism regularly as an employee or freelancer. Applicants may be connected to print operations, radio, television, websites, podcasts, online publications, wire services, or magazines of general public interest. There are no academic prerequisites.

Applications from international journalists are welcome.

Stipend and Benefits

A stipend of $65,000 for nine months for your salary, paid to your sponsoring organization, or directly to the fellow in the case of independent journalists.

  • A residency allowance based on family requirements for fellows moving to the Milwaukee metropolitan area for the duration of the fellowship: up to $4,000 for a single, married or partnered fellow, up to $6,000 for a fellow with one child, up to $7,000 for a fellow with two children, up to $8,000 for a fellow with three or more children. Fellows submit rent receipts from the rental property owner.
  • A moving allowance based on family size and distance. The allowance, covering the move to and from Milwaukee, ranges from $2,000 to $4,000 in total. (Fellows from the Milwaukee metropolitan area are not eligible for a moving allowance.)
  • A travel and research allowance up to $8,000. This covers project-related travel as well as technology, data and document costs and equipment needs.
  • Employee benefits continue to be paid by the fellow’s employer, where applicable. Please contact us if you have questions on this.
  • Fellows and their spouses are eligible during the fellowship for tuition remission (up to seven credits) for courses offered by Marquette University.

Selection and Criteria

A proposal to produce a rigorous, multimedia public service journalism project with the potential to have major impact, lead to significant reform, and investigate and explain how individuals and groups can identify creative solutions to social problems.

The ability to complete the project during the fellowship using Milwaukee as your primary home.

The ability to integrate Marquette students as part of a reporting team.

The capacity to ensure the greatest possible exposure for the reporting once completed.

An advisory committee consisting of distinguished journalists and Marquette faculty and alumni will interview candidates for O’Brien fellowships in Feb. 2020 from a pool of finalists recommended by College of Communication journalism faculty.

Following those interviews, the advisory committee will send a list of recommended fellows to the dean of the Diederich College of Communication for final review.

https://www.marquette.edu/obrien-fellowship/application.php

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Reynolds Journalism Institute Fellowship

The Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute invites proposals from individuals and organizations who wish to partner with us on innovative projects that strengthen journalism’s future.

Chosen projects often include devising new strategies or models to solve a problem, building new tools, creating a prototype or advancing a prototype so it’s ready for investment or launch. All projects will be built and implemented in a newsroom within the span of the 8 month fellowship.

Whatever your idea, its benefits should be able to extend to other news organizations and the people who depend on them. You will publish regular updates at rjionline.org to share what you’re learning and how it could benefit news organizations. At the end of your fellowship, you will publish the results and lessons learned from the implementation of your project after it has been tested or utilized in a newsroom.

RJI Fellowships are open to U.S. citizens and news organizations as well as international news outlets. We also welcome proposals from international journalists who plan to partner with U.S.-based news, technology and civil society organizations.

https://www.rjionline.org/fellowships
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