ProPublica seeks fellows for Electionland Project

You won’t be covering the horse race — you’ll be covering voting itself: voting rights, election integrity, cyber security of election systems, etc. And you’ll be helping journalists across the country cover it, too.

Electionland started in the run-up to the 2016 election. It was the largest collaborative journalism project ever to cover a single event. More than 1,100 journalists took part. This is your chance to be at the very center of its next chapter. You’ll report your own stories — like this one— and help support dozens of hand-picked journalists do local reporting — like this— on voting rights and election integrity.

Reporting fellows at ProPublica have gone on to work at The New York Times, Bloomberg, Politico, NPR, Center for Public Integrity and the Chicago Tribune — as well as ProPublica itself.

The fellowship is full time, runs from early June through the election, and is paid. It will be based at our newsroom in New York.

There are two kinds of fellowships available: Reporting and Data/Interactive Graphics.

For the reporting fellowship, we’re looking for someone who:

  • Has terrific research chops, with experience generating data sets for reporting.
  • Is committed to aggressively reporting stories about election integrity and voting rights.
  • Is truly excited about helping local reporters do excellent journalism on Election Day, and is willing to think creatively about the best ways to collaborate across newsrooms.

For the data/interactive graphics fellowship, we’re looking for someone who:

  • Has experience building interactive graphics using JavaScript and HTML/CSS and/or web projects using a framework like Django or Ruby on Rails.
  • Wants to build tools to help readers, researchers and reporters find important insights in large data sets.
  • Has experience (volunteer or paid) working in journalism, open data, civic hacking, etc.

We know there are great candidates who won’t fit everything we’ve described above, or who have important skills we haven’t thought of. If that’s you, don’t hesitate to apply. There’s a place on the application for you to tell us more.

We are dedicated to improving our newsroom, in part by better reflecting the people we cover. (Here is a breakdown of our own staff.) We are committed to diversity and building an inclusive environment for people of all backgrounds and ages, and we’re taking active steps to meet this commitment. We especially encourage members of historically underrepresented communities to apply, including women, people of color, LGBTQ people and people with disabilities.

What you should send us

The most important part by far is your past work. In the application, you’ll be asked to send us your best clips or URLs to your best interactive projects. If you played an uncredited role, that’s ok too. You’ll have a chance to tell us what you did for the project.

We’ll also ask you to submit a memo that describes what you think you’d add to a project like Electionland. Do you have experience doing collaborative work? Tell us about it! Do you have experience doing in-depth research? Tell us about that, too.

We also want you to do amazing reporting during your time here. Tell us what kind of stories you’d most like to cover as part of Electionland. What specific voting issues do you want to cover? How would those stories be told? How would you imagine achieving impact? Show us how you think.

If all of this sounds exciting to you, apply using one of these forms:

The deadline for applications is March 31.

Have questions? Email scott.klein@propublica.org.

https://www.propublica.org/atpropublica/propublica-is-seeking-fellows-for-its-electionland-project

 

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Mother Jones offers fellowship

So you want to be a journalist. You want to learn how a great magazine comes together, how to cover breaking news, how investigations happen, how awards are won. You want skills, you want experience, and you wouldn’t mind cash. Well, you’ve come to the right place.

The Ben Bagdikian Fellowship Program offers a crash course in investigative journalism. Mother Jones fellows dive deep into every aspect of a national multimedia outfit—from making news to making it pretty, ensuring its impact, and mastering the inner workings of nonprofit publishing. Fellowship positions include:

Mother Jones fellowships are full-time positions lasting six months, with the opportunity to extend the position for an additional six months after that. New fellowship cohorts begin twice a year, on June 1 and December 1, and applications for each cohort are due on April 1 and October 1, respectively, unless otherwise noted (see below for more details on the application). Those who are still in school or are only available part-time are not eligible, nor can fellowships be used for course credit. Mother Jones is unable to furnish work visas for those applying from outside of the United States. With additional questions regarding eligibility, please email us at fellowships@motherjones.com.

Fellows receive a $2,275 monthly stipend, supported by grants from the Irving Harris and Lannan Foundations and by the generosity of our contributors.

Mother Jones believes that a diverse newsroom strengthens the quality of our workplace and reporting. We strongly encourage people from all backgrounds to apply.

 

Position Descriptions

Editorial Fellowship (San Francisco and DC): The editorial fellowship is a research-intensive foray into investigative journalism. Fellows work closely with reporters and editors on everything from fact-checking and researching to reporting. You’ll receive training in every aspect of the editorial process, from research tools and tactics to libel law and reporting strategies. You’ll attend regular skill-building sessions covering topics that span the operations of a media organization.

Editorial fellows in our San Francisco office, our headquarters, work closely on our award-winning bimonthly print magazine. By fact-checking our investigations, author Q&As, and front-of-the-book reported pieces, fellows re-engineer a reporter’s work and learn what it takes to report and put together a magazine story. Fellows in San Francisco also work on our website and are expected and encouraged to write for the web on subjects including politics, climate change, criminal justice, reproductive rights, and culture.

Editorial fellows in our DC office get a research- and reporting-intensive foray into the life of investigative beat reporters and editors covering Washington. An immersive and fast-paced mix of fact-checking, web production, research, and blogging, the fellowship means working closely with our team of more than a dozen reporters and editors in the Beltway to learn the ropes of reporting breaking news, delivering investigative content, and promoting stories through social media and other outlets.

We are currently accepting applications for our June 1 cohort. Applications are due April 1. To learn how to apply, click here.

 

Online Editorial Fellowship (San Francisco): Are you obsessed with digital media and eager to strengthen the accuracy and quality of what gets passed around the internet? Online editorial fellows work alongside our editorial fellows to fact-check, produce, and improve content, but they also work under the direction of our web production team to build and test new digital-based projects that keep our website looking fresh. Online editorial fellows are expected and encouraged to write for the web on subjects including politics, climate change, criminal justice, reproductive rights, and culture. Applicants should have experience with the back end of at least one CMS, a working knowledge of HTML and experience with Photoshop, and social media mastery of at least two platforms.

We are currently accepting applications for our June 1 cohort. Applications are due April 1. To learn how to apply, click here.

 

Social Media Fellowship (San Francisco): Our all-star social media fellows create web content, keep us current on social platforms, and enhance our coverage of breaking news. This fellow will work closely with Mother Jones’ digital news team across our three offices. You’ll learn about every aspect of modern online publishing, collaborating alongside seasoned editors and reporters. Aside from helping promote Mother Jones stories, you’ll help fact-check our website. You’ll also attend regular skill-building sessions covering topics that span the operations of a media organization. Applicants should have experience with the back end of at least one CMS, a working knowledge of HTML and Photoshop, endless enthusiasm for digital storytelling languages, and facility and deep familiarity with social media.

We are not currently accepting applications for this position.

 

Digital Media Fellowship (New York City): The digital media fellow helps keep Mother Jones current on social platforms and enhances our multimedia coverage of breaking news—especially with snappy, smart video. This fellow works closely with the digital and multimedia news team to learn about every aspect of modern online publishing, collaborating with seasoned editors and reporters. You’ll also attend regular skill-building sessions covering topics that span the operations of a media organization. Applications should have experience with video editing; familiarity with Adobe Creative Cloud suite (especially Premiere); evidence of hands-on production, including for video and shooting in the field; comfort with content management systems; a zeal for online news and media; and a working knowledge of HTML and experience with Photoshop.

We are not currently accepting applications for this position.

 

Strategic Communications Fellowship (San Francisco): This fellow will work with Mother Jones’ communications strategist—in collaboration with staff across the organization—to build buzz for Mother Jones investigations and breaking news, increase our impact, and engage with our audience. The communications fellow will assist in pitching television and radio appearances, building communication with key organizations and influencers, and identifying events and speaking opportunities for MoJo staff. He or she will help plan and promote Mother Jones events and test out new ways to engage with its readers, while also tracking Mother Jones’ impact and helping submit its journalism for prestigious awards.

This is a unique opportunity to learn and practice strategic communications, project management, and audience engagement skills while helping a major investigative reporting organization tell important stories and increase its impact.

We are not currently accepting applications for this position.

 

How to Apply

Mother Jones accepts new fellow cohorts twice a year, on June 1 and December 1, unless otherwise noted. Applications are due two months in advance of the start date, on April 1 and October 1.

To apply to our editorial, online editorial, and social media fellowship positions, please submit the following to fellowships@motherjones.com:

  • In a single PDF, please send a cover letter, résumé (including the names and numbers of two references), and two writing samples.
  • In your cover letter, please clearly state: which position, and in which office, you are applying for, as well as which start date you are interested in.
  • In the body of your email, please clearly state: which position, and in which office, you are applying for, as well as which start date you are interested in.

To apply for the Digital Media Fellowship, please submit the following to fellowships@motherjones.com:

  • A cover letter and résumé, including the names and numbers of two references.
  • Two videos you have worked on, describing what role you played in their production (i.e. editor, shooter, producer, etc.).
  • Two writing samples (links to online versions preferred).
  • In the body of your email, please clearly state: which position, and in which office, you are applying for, as well as which start date you are interested in.

 

The Ben Bagdikian Fellowship Program

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Fund for Investigative Journalism Grant

Off the Coast of Gorée Island

The Fund for Investigative Journalism’s Board of Directors meets three times each year to consider grant applications for investigative projects. The next deadline is Monday, May 7, 2018 at 11:59 pm Eastern time.

The maximum grant is $10,000. Grants cover out-of-pocket expenses such as travel, document collection and equipment rental. The Fund also considers requests for small stipends, as part of the budget.

With the generosity of the Scripps Howard Foundation, FIJ has the ability to provide mentors to a select number of our grant recipients.

To apply for a grant (and request a mentor), visit: investigate.submittable.com.

The application portal will be open at least one month before the deadline.

If you are not prepared to apply for the current round of grants, one additional opportunity will be available later this year, with the following deadline: Monday, September 24.

Letter of Commitment. Before you apply, be sure to obtain a “Letter of Commitment” from a news editor, pledging that news outlet will publish or air the specific story you propose – as long as it meets the publication’s expectations and standards. This letter should not be thought of as an unqualified pledge. If the work is not satisfactory, the news outlet cannot be expected to publish it. FIJ needs this commitment before it makes a grant because it doesn’t have the capacity to help reporters place stories. The letter must be written on letterhead that includes contact information for the news outlet and the individual signing it.

The Board of Directors looks for:  stories that break new ground and expose wrongdoing – such as corruption, malfeasance, or misuse of power – in the public and private sectors.

The Fund encourages proposals written for ethnic media and submitted by journalists of color.

It is Fund policy to pay the first half of approved grants to successful applicants, with the second half of the grant paid on evidence of publication of a finished project in accordance with the original proposal. Second half grants are not guaranteed if projects are not completed in a timely fashion.

Application requirements include a proposal, resume, work sample, budget, and a letter of commitment from a news outlet pledging to run the story if it is completed as proposed and meets the news organization’s journalistic standards. All application documents must be written in English and budgets expressed in U.S. dollars.

Guidelines for international reporting grants: To be considered, foreign-based story proposals must come from US-based reporters or have a strong US angle, involving American citizens, government, or business. All stories must be published in English and have a media outlet in the United States.

Budget guidelines: Your estimated budget must itemize expenses of reporting such as travel, document fees, equipment rentals, and small stipends. Be specific. Vague line items may be denied. Identify other sources of funding. If you are applying for a book grant, provide detail as to resources available from the publisher, and explain why a grant is needed.

Disclaimer of Liability: The Fund for Investigative Journalism’s role in assisting journalists is limited to making grants. The Fund assumes no liability for the legal and/or safety risks undertaken by journalists in the course of their reporting.

Mentors: FIJ now offers a competitive opportunity to be matched with a mentor. FIJ operates this program in partnership with Investigative Reporters and Editors and the Society of Environmental Journalists, with seed funding from the Scripps Howard Foundation. As part of the application form, we ask that you explain how a mentor can help you and whether you can commit to keep your mentor informed of your progress.  Mentors act as sounding boards, and work with grantees over the length of their projects. If you were previously awarded a grant and are seeking a mentor, please contact FIJ for information on how to apply.

Questions: Executive Director Sandy Bergo and Director of Operations Bobby Calvan welcome questions about the application process and requirements by email, sbergo@fij.orgbcalvan@fij.org, or phone, 202-662-7564. Contact us before the application deadline and we will be happy to help. Application materials cannot be changed after they are submitted.

Review: The Board of Directors reviews and votes on all eligible proposals. Approximately six weeks after the application deadline has passed, applicants will be notified by email of the board’s decision.

Additional resources available to investigative reporters: Freelance Investigative Reporters and Editors (FIRE) for grants and services such as researchers and pro-bono lawyers, http://www.projectword.org/fire/guidelines; The George Polk Grants for Investigative Reporting, liu.edu/polk/grants; The Investigative Fund, http://www.theinvestigativefund.org/; the Pulitzer Center, http://pulitzercenter.org/;  for economic and business topics: McGraw Fellowship for Business Journalismand The Society of Environmental Journalists, http://www.sej.org/initiatives/fej-program-guidelines. For a residential fellowship, the Logan Nonfiction Program, http://careyinstitute.org/programs/nonfiction/nonfiction-fellowship/  Contact each organization directly to learn what these programs currently offer, their application requirements and deadlines.

 

Apply For a Grant

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Reporting fellowships to El Salvador and US/Mexico border available

REPORTING TRIP DATES: June 14 – 29, 2018

DEADLINE: March 26, 2018 at 11:59 PM Eastern Time (New York)

APPLY: IWMF’s Submittable page

The IWMF is pleased to announce its Reporting Fellowships to El Salvador and the U.S./Mexico Border: Laredo and Eagle Pass, Texas. A group of journalists will report on Rural Security and Development from San Salvador, El Salvador. Concurrently, another group of journalists will cover Trade and its Human Impact from the U.S./Mexico Border: Laredo and Eagle Pass, Texas with the opportunity for limited travel across the border. These opportunities are part of the Adelante Reporting Initiative. The work of the 95 IWMF Adelante Fellows has been published and aired by leading media outlets around the world. The IWMF will continue to lead reporting trips to Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, and the Mexico-United States border until 2020.

ABOUT THE REPORTING TRIPS: Both trips will take place June 14 – 29, 2018, which includes travel dates. All Fellows will begin their trip in Mexico City, Mexico, where they will complete a four-day, comprehensive security training and an orientation about Latin America and Adelante focused countries from June 14 – 18. Fellows then depart for a nine-day, independent or team reporting trip in San Salvador or Laredo and Eagle Pass, Texas with the opportunity for limited travel across the U.S./Mexico border.

Fellows will have the opportunity to network with in-country journalists, collaborate with international peers, and access a wide range of sources and sites relevant to their reporting. The IWMF reserves the right to change reporting locations based on the real-time security situation in both locations. The feasibility of day trips outside the base locations will be assessed on a case-by-case basis and determined by IWMF security protocols.

ELIGIBILITY:

  • Affiliated or freelance women journalists with three (3) or more years of professional experience working in news media. Internships do not count toward professional experience;
  • Women journalists of all nationalities are welcome to apply;
  • Non-native English speakers must have excellent written and verbal English skills in order to fully participate in and benefit from the program;
  • Applicant must be able to show proof of interest from an editor or have a proven track record of publication in prominent media outlets.

Have questions about the application process? Want to hear from IWMF Fellows about their experiences on the ground? Before submitting an application, journalists are encouraged to review the application criteria and frequently asked questions (FAQs). Also check out our most recent Adelante Reporting Fellowship Twitter Chat and a sample application.

TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS AND EXPENSES: The IWMF arranges travel and in-country logistics for all Fellows within the scope of the Fellowship base location and trip dates. The IWMF also covers Fellowship-related costs within the framework of the reporting trip including travel, lodging, meals, and fixers/interpreters, unless a selected journalist’s news organization wishes to assume these costs. Visa costs will also be covered. Fellows living outside the U.S. are responsible for procuring all necessary visas, for which they will be reimbursed at the conclusion of the Fellowship.

ONLINE APPLICATION: The IWMF will accept online applications from February 20 – March 26, 2018 at 11:59 PM Eastern Time (New York). Apply using the IWMF’s Submittable page.

 

Call for Applications: Reporting Fellowships to El Salvador & U.S./Mexico Border – June 2018

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Bringing Home the World: International Reporting Fellowship Program for Minority Journalists

 

The Bringing Home the World Fellowship sends U.S. minority journalists overseas to cover stories that resonate with their local communities. We aim to support diverse new voices and fresh perspectives on underreported global issues, and advance minority journalists’ careers. Applications are now open! Scroll below to learn more and apply by March 25, 2018.

The program is founded on the belief that if you change the storyteller you change the story.

Since the program began in 2011, fellows have produced hundreds of stories that have propelled their careers and enriched their audiences.

About the Fellowship

The program provides support for fellows to report in-country for up to two weeks, including costs for travel, lodging, and interpreters.

ICFJ brings the selected fellows to Washington, D.C., for a comprehensive orientation that includes story workshopping, safety training, multimedia storytelling, and advice on how to work with fixers/interpreters. We offer a mentor with knowledge of the country to be visited, who can connect fellows with sources on the ground.

Fellows must complete their stories by a given date and publish or air them in U.S. media outlets as well as in ICFJ’s online compendium of fellowship stories. ICFJ also assists freelance fellows to place their stories in major news outlets.

Apply to the Fellowship

The fellowship is open to English-speaking minority journalists working at a U.S. news organization or as freelance journalists in the United States. However, stories are not required to be published in English only. Apply for the fellowship by March 25, 2018.

Tips for applying: Please consult a Q&A chat here with past fellows, as well as this article .

Key 2018 dates:

March 25: Application deadline

May 1: Selected journalists are notified

May 30-June 1: Orientation in Washington, D.C. (all fellows are required to attend)

Aug. 30: Last date to complete reporting trip

Oct. 1: Deadline to publish or broadcast stories

 

https://ijnet.org/en/advertisements/bringing-home-world-international-reporting-fellowship-program-minority-journalists?utm_source=bulletin&utm_campaign=0305

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Persephone Miel Fellowship for International Reporting

The fellowship, overseen by the Pulitzer Center in collaboration with Internews, is designed to help journalists from the developing world do the kind of reporting they’ve always wanted to do and enable them to bring their work to a broader international audience. The fellowship will benefit those with limited access to other fellowships and those whose work is not routinely disseminated internationally. Miel fellowships involve reporting from within the applicant’s native country—or following migrant communities from there to other locations.

See the announcement of the fellowship at the Internews ceremony in honor of Persephone in October 2010.

Eligibility: The Persephone Miel fellowships are open to all journalists, writers, photographers, radio producers or filmmakers, staff journalists as well as freelancers and media professionals outside the U.S. who are seeking to report from their home country. Women and journalists from developing countries are strongly encouraged to apply. Applicants must be proficient in English.

Selection: The fellowship recipient will be selected by the Pulitzer Center in consultation with Internews. Selection will be based on the strength of the proposed topic and the strength of the applicant’s work as demonstrated in their work samples. We are looking for projects that explore systemic issues in the applicant’s native country and that provide an overarching thesis, rather than individual spot-reports from the field.

Terms of travel grant: The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting will provide a travel grant of $5000 for a reporting project on topics and regions of global importance, with an emphasis on issues that have gone unreported or under-reported in the mainstream media. Specific grant terms are negotiated during the application process based on the scope of proposed work and intended outcomes. Payment of the first half of the grant is disbursed prior to travel, upon receipt of required materials, and the second half on submission of the principal work for publication/broadcast.

The Pulitzer Center will also offer $2500 to cover travel expenses associated with travel to Washington, D.C., to meet with Pulitzer Center staff and journalists and take part in a 2-day workshop. Depending on the specific needs of the fellow, this may occur prior or after the reporting takes place.

The Center works with fellowship recipients to distribute their work across multiple platforms in the U.S. to reach the widest possible audience. Projects with multimedia components that combine print, photography and video are strongly encouraged.

 

Where to applyClick here to go to the Pulitzer Center Grant Application webform.

http://pulitzercenter.org/blog/persephone-miel-fellowship-2018?utm_source=Email&utm_medium=Newsletter&utm_campaign=MielOpen

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Call for entries: Early Childhood Development Reporting Fellowship

Interested in becoming an influencer and leader for children’s development in your country? If producing high quality reporting and solutions-oriented stories about nutrition and early childhood development issues is one of your passions, then apply to this yearlong fellowship, which will include two international reporting trips as well as continual mentoring and several virtual webinars.

The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), in partnership with the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) and Fundação Maria Cecilia Souto Vidigal, is recruiting for 10 Early Childhood Development Reporting Fellows. The goal of the fellowships is to improve news coverage of child health and form a global network of reporters covering this critically important issue.

Who can apply?

The Fellowship is open to journalists covering issues of child health and development for news outlets based in Bangladesh, Brazil, India, Kenya, Nigeria and Tanzania. Journalists from all mediums are encouraged to apply: radio, broadcast, print and online. An ideal candidate will have previous experience covering early childhood development issues, but journalists who currently cover health or nutrition-related topics and are interested in increasing their coverage of children’s issues are welcome to apply.

Successful applicants must be employed by a news outlet or have a commitment to publish/broadcast from a news outlet to participate. Applicants must be proficient in English. Stories submitted may be written in your native language; however, reporting project proposals must be submitted in English.

The fellowship

This is the third of three groups of fellows that will participate in the program between 2017 and 2019. The fellowship term for this second cohort will run from March 2018 – March 2019.

During the year-long program, the fellows will receive virtual training, mentoring and financial support to produce regular stories on nutrition and early-childhood development, relevant to their home countries.

The program will begin with a virtual orientation (webinar) after which each fellow will be assigned a mentor who will work with them as they produce stories on early childhood development issues. ICFJ will conduct regular webinars during the year of the fellowship.

The program also includes two reporting trips. ICFJ will send all fellows to a country that is implementing a successful and innovative approach to supporting childhood development. The fellows will meet with early childhood development experts in the field and will produce stories with the help of their mentors.

ICFJ and its partners are currently working on selecting the dates and destinations for both trips. ICFJ will cover all of the fellowship expenses.

How do I apply?

To become an ECD Reporting Fellow, candidates must complete a Fellowship application. Applicants should include:

• A resume or CV
• Examples of stories produced on early-childhood development
• A reporting-project proposal that outlines story ideas the Fellow will pursue and a reporting and publishing/broadcasting plan.

Entries must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EST on Sunday, March 4, 2018. Apply here.

https://ijnet.org/en/advertisements/call-entries-early-childhood-development-reporting-fellowship?utm_source=bulletin&utm_campaign=0129

 

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Grants fund investigative journalism

The Fund for Investigative Journalism’s Board of Directors meets three times each year to consider grant applications for investigative projects. The next deadline is Monday February 5, 2018 at 11:59 pm Eastern time.

The maximum grant is $10,000. Grants cover out-of-pocket expenses such as travel, document collection and equipment rental. The Fund also considers requests for small stipends, as part of the budget.

With the generosity of the Scripps Howard Foundation, FIJ has the ability to provide mentors to a select number of our grant recipients.

To apply for a grant (and request a mentor), visit: investigate.submittable.com. 

If you are not prepared to apply for the current round of grants, two additional opportunities will be available later this year, with the following deadlines: Monday, May 7 and Monday, September 24.

Before you apply, be sure to obtain a “Letter of Commitment” from a news editor, pledging that news outlet will publish or air the specific story you propose – as long as it meets the publication’s expectations and standards. This letter should not be thought of as an unqualified pledge. If the work is not satisfactory, the news outlet cannot be expected to publish it. FIJ needs this commitment before it makes a grant because it doesn’t have the capacity to help reporters place stories.

The Board of Directors looks for:  stories that break new ground and expose wrongdoing – such as corruption, malfeasance, or misuse of power – in the public and private sectors.

The Fund encourages proposals written for ethnic media and submitted by journalists of color.

It is Fund policy to pay the first half of approved grants to successful applicants, with the second half of the grant paid on evidence of publication of a finished project in accordance with the original proposal. Second half grants are not guaranteed if projects are not completed in a timely fashion.

Application requirements include a proposal, resume, work sample, budget, and a letter of commitment from a news outlet pledging to run the story if it is completed as proposed and meets the news organization’s journalistic standards. All application documents must be written in English and budgets expressed in U.S. dollars.

Guidelines for international reporting grants: To be considered, foreign-based story proposals must come from US-based reporters or have a strong US angle, involving American citizens, government, or business. All stories must be published in English and have a media outlet in the United States.

Budget guidelines: Your estimated budget must itemize expenses of reporting such as travel, document fees, equipment rentals, and small stipends. Be specific. Vague line items may be denied. Identify other sources of funding. If you are applying for a book grant, provide detail as to resources available from the publisher, and explain why a grant is needed.

Disclaimer of Liability: The Fund for Investigative Journalism’s role in assisting journalists is limited to making grants. The Fund assumes no liability for the legal and/or safety risks undertaken by journalists in the course of their reporting.

Mentors: FIJ now offers a competitive opportunity to be matched with a mentor. FIJ operates this program in partnership with Investigative Reporters and Editors and the Society of Environmental Journalists, with seed funding from the Scripps Howard Foundation. As part of the application form, we ask that you explain how a mentor can help you and whether you can commit to keep your mentor informed of your progress.  Mentors act as sounding boards, and work with grantees over the length of their projects. If you were previously awarded a grant and are seeking a mentor, please contact FIJ for information on how to apply.

Questions: Executive Director Sandy Bergo welcomes questions about the application process and requirements by email, sbergo@fij.org, or phone, 202-662-7564.

Review: The Board of Directors reviews and votes on all eligible proposals. Approximately six weeks after the application deadline has passed, applicants will be notified by email of the board’s decision.

Additional resources available to investigative reporters: Freelance Investigative Reporters and Editors (FIRE) for grants and services such as researchers and pro-bono lawyers, http://www.projectword.org/fire/guidelines; The George Polk Grants for Investigative Reporting, liu.edu/polk/grants; The Investigative Fund, http://www.theinvestigativefund.org/; the Pulitzer Center, http://pulitzercenter.org/;  for economic and business topics: McGraw Fellowship for Business Journalismand The Society of Environmental Journalists, http://www.sej.org/initiatives/fej-program-guidelines. For a residential fellowship, the Logan Nonfiction Program, http://careyinstitute.org/programs/nonfiction/nonfiction-fellowship/  Contact each organization directly to learn what these programs currently offer, their application requirements and deadlines.

Apply For a Grant

 

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Spend Two Months Reporting from Germany!

 

American journalists have until March 1, 2018, to apply for a professional exchange program in Germany. Successful applicants will spend August and September living, working and reporting for their home and host news organizations from across the Atlantic.
The Arthur F. Burns Fellowships is a competitive program open to U.S., Canadian and German journalists between the age of 21-40, who are employed by a newspaper, news magazine, broadcast station, news agency or who work freelance and/or online. Applicants must have demonstrated journalistic talent and a strong interest in North American-European affairs. German language proficiency is not required, but it is encouraged.
The Fellowship offers three options:
Option 1: Following an orientation program in Washington, North American fellows participate in an intensive, two-week-long language training at Goethe Institutes in fellows’ host cities. Expenses for language training will be covered and details are made available shortly after announcement of selected fellows (around the end of April). In August and September, fellows work as temporary staff members at host newspapers, magazines, and radio and television stations.
Option 2: As of the 2015 program, an additional format has been introduced allowing North American journalists the opportunity to work in Germany for five to six weeks, throughout August and part of September. Journalists who prefer this format will not be formally “hosted” by a German newsroom but will instead be connected with Burns program alumni who will mentor them during their time abroad. Fellows will focus on implementing a previously proposed major story or project for their home media. The story or project must be endorsed by an editor at a media outlet upon application and publication guaranteed. They will not participate in the two-week language training.
Option 3: As of the 2016 program, a third option has been introduced allowing North American developers, technologists, designers, UX experts and digital entrepreneurs the chance to spend two months at a German news organization or technology company. There they will work with their new colleagues while developing tools they can bring back to their own news organizations or companies. They will spend the first two-weeks of the Fellowship in the intensive language training.
Each U.S. Fellow receives a $4,000 stipend to cover living expenses during the 9-week-long fellowship in Germany. Participants also receive $1,200 for travel expenses or a travel voucher, and the program also pays living expenses during the orientation in Washington, D.C. Those fellows on the 5-6 week program will receive an amount proportional to their fellowship length.
https://www.icfj.org/arthur-f-burns-fellowship-application-2017
**U.S. Journalists Only**
For more information, please visit www.icfj.org/burns or contact burns@icfj.org.
Damaso Reyes, task force co-chair, is an alum of this program and would be happy to answer any questions about the program you might have.
Posted in Fellowships | Comments Off on Spend Two Months Reporting from Germany!

Crowdfunding platform for journalists calls for applications

Press Start is designed to help relieve the financial burden on journalists in repressive countries, defined as those deemed “not free” or “partly free” in the current edition of Freedom House’s Freedom of the Press survey. For a list, click here.

To apply for a campaign, you should have at least three years of experience in your country’s domestic media, working on subjects of social importance, which could include but are not limited to politics, human rights, social issues (including gender, minority, and sexual orientation), health, and the environment. We accept applications for traditional print stories and series as well as photo essays, multimedia projects, and reported, influential blogs. We particularly welcome journalists with investigative experience who are seeking funds for a new investigation.

We prefer that applications be in English but can accept Russian and French. All must include the following:

  • a CV
  • links to three samples of your work
  • an essay of introduction no more than 1 ½ single-spaced pages (for examples, see the journalists’ profiles on our website). Tell us why you became a journalist and what challenges you face practicing independent journalism in your country, and mention some of your notable work.
  • a detailed proposal of one-half to one single-spaced page for a story or series. We do not want open-ended questions that you would like to answer in your reporting (which could result in no story). A good proposal would presumably contain an angle on a topic you have already reported on (and therefore have some reason to believe would bear fruit) but have not had the resources to explore. Please tell us the types of sources you would consult and how your project would be new or original.
  • a budget proposal broken down by major expense categories, such as travel costs, interpreters, and equipment. Requests should be in line with our other campaigns (see the “Our Journalists” section of our homepage for a rough idea), and should be no more than $2,000. We will expect to see receipts at the conclusion of your reporting
  • two letters of recommendation from people you have worked with
  • a letter from a commissioning editor at the outlet where you intend to place your work stating his or her interest in publishing/posting/showing the piece(s). If you are a staff journalist, this will likely be from your employer (but does not have to be). If the same editor is also writing one of your letters of recommendation, the expression of interest can be included in the recommendation letter.

To maintain the quality of work produced by Press Start journalists (and therefore keep the confidence of our donors) we urge that our journalists’ projects be subject to a traditional editing process. That means we discourage placement in self-edited outlets, including blogs. We understand, however, that in some countries, little to no independent media exist for placement of investigations, making blogs the only option. In such cases, we require:

  • information on the unique number of visitors to the site per month
  • an outline of the project, including the profile of people to be interviewed and data sought, before work begins
  • a first draft of the finished project for review before posting

Freelancers or salaried journalists are free to apply. Whatever your status, it is crucial that either your introductory essay or your CV identify which media you are currently working for and that you provide enough information about it to help us assess its independence.

 

https://www.pressstart.org/apply

Posted in Grant | Comments Off on Crowdfunding platform for journalists calls for applications